Category Archives: Iliad

Senior Activities

JENNIFER SANCHEZ/ Pop-culture Editor

It’s senior year, and that means senior activities, but Poway is severely lacking in number. Poway needs more activities for upperclassman; trips to amusement parks, senior sunrise, a beach day, a luau. Adding more senior events, will increase our school spirit, as well as unifying seniors as a class.

A top priority would have to be getting Poway High seniors to an amusement park. All the other schools in PUSD attend Disneyland as a senior field trip, or have their gradnite there. According to ASB director Mrs. Pratt the trip to an amusement park like Disneyland relies on a senior class president to organize the trip. Maybe it’s time to put some pressure on ASB.

Senior sunrise is the iconic experience of watching the sunrise sitting on your cars, while having breakfast with friends in the school parking. The whole class wakes up before the sun and hangs out before school. This activity could be simply organized by the students themselves, for an easy senior activity.

Senior beach day could be one of the year’s last senior activities, with everyone meeting at the beach for a barbeque, hanging out, and relaxing. A day in the sun and sand would allow students to take advantage of the lovely California weather, and catch a tan. A beach day would also allow them to relax before the stress of senior year and college apps kick in.

A luau would be a great way for the school to increase attendance on minimum days such as PSAT day. Students could have some food, play some games, listen to music, and enjoy each other’s company on such short days.

Having more senior activities will require more planning and effort by Poway’s ASB, but it will make a more spirited and tight-knit group of Titans. More activities for upperclassmen will have a positive outcome and will definitely be worth the effort.

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Team Traditions

RYAN FITZGERALD/ Staff Writer

Teams have all different types of CIF traditions. This year, two sports teams are changing their look for CIF are boys water polo and football. Both teams decided to start new traditions and continue old traditions for this year’s CIF. Both traditions relating to the hair of all the players on the team.

This year, boys water polo decided to start a new tradition for themselves. The team has decided to adopt an “old man haircut” for CIF. This haircut is shaved on top and normal everywhere else. The entire team met up on the pool deck before their first CIF practice and senior Bailey Loughnane got a hair trimmer and cut off the top part of everyone’s hair. Everyone except four players shaved their heads. The team decided to shave their heads for good luck and for intimidation.

Unfortunately for the water polo team, their CIF haircuts only lasted them until semifinals of CIF when they lost to UNC.

“It sucks that we didn’t go D1 all the way with the flow” junior water polo player Kellen McGrath said.

The football team decided to keep up their tradition of bleaching their hair for CIF. The team debated at first whether or not they would but ultimately decided to keep the tradition going. The team ultimately lost in the first round of CIF which makes student and players question whether or not it was even worth it.

“Its unfortunate we didn’t get very far this year in CIF. I think this year will help show us what we need to work on for next season” junior football player Maguire Withrow said.

 

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Cars: Enemy of Boarders

ALLI GOODBODY/ Staff Writer

Being a skateboarder in a city is a very dangerous thing, especially with cars paying almost no attention. There is already danger being a pedestrian on foot, but if you are on wheels, you are far more at risk. I speak from experience, having been clipped by a car on my board while crossing Poway Road while the crosswalk light was green.

Car drivers tend to be reckless and careless towards pedestrians of all types, even motorcyclists. I have seen multiple bike riders have to either brake hard or swerve and hit the curb due to a driver just not caring enough to look. People just drive without consistently checking mirrors and their blind spots, or even simply looking to the side. Really, how hard is glancing to the side? The driver who clipped me wasn’t even going on a green light. They ran a red light while I was crossing the street.

Stopping on a bike or scooter is far easier than a skateboard because you have actual brakes on your wheels instead of having to use your foot. Newton’s laws dictate that an object in motion tends to stay in motion, so trying to use your foot to stop the momentum of a fast moving board could send you flying. Cars cannot expect boarders to be able to stop on a dime just so they can drive however they please. Our turning radius on a board is also very limited. Most boards can’t even make a forty five degree turn quickly.

Car drivers should learn to drive safely and slowly when confronted with pedestrians on foot and on wheels, to make the world a safer place for all.

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Fellow Titans who have survived cancer

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Editor-in-Chief

Every year, over 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer, a plague where tissue cells start growing abnormally and uncontrol­lably. Some fellow Titans survived this horrific dis­ease and were willing to share their story.

Determined survivor and amazing English teacher, TeriAnne Libby returned to Poway High with her head held high after treatment and recovery for most of the 2015-2016 school year. “The waiting and not know­ing until the CT scans came back was the worst week, because you don’t know if it had spread,” Libby mentioned. Post eighteen weeks of chemotherapy, the pain continued as she received surgery then radiation for five long weeks.

“The hardest thing to go through would be chemotherapy, because it takes away all your energy, and it feels like you have the flu,” Libby explained.

Libby had a lot of support from family and friends all through the treatment. She was out for most of the school year, and re­turned during the last six weeks of the grading period, even though she was tired and was still doing radiation.

Another strong-willed survivor is math teacher, Susan Sebas­tian. She was quite surprised when given news of the diagnosis. Before making a full recovery, she suffered a long process of five brutal surgeries, fol­lowed by tiring chemotherapy that took 19 months to complete. During this process, Sebastian always had her family and friends by her side, which is the best moral support anyone can ever have.

“I have a new joy of life, and a determina­tion to be the best me I can be,” Sebastian stated.

Sebastian gave some advice to people who have been diagnosed: “Follow recommenda­tions of doctors working with you if you are diag­nosed, but most impor­tantly, all women should follow medical guide­lines—regular mammo­grams and self-exams— that allow breast cancer to be detected before it’s too advanced.”

Breast cancer is an unexpected and evil disease, and has taken away many important lives. Luckily, Libby and Sebastian are all right, and even though the struggle is un­imaginable, all the Titans are here for them and anyone who is going through this.

 

Seen above: Math teacher, Susan Sebastian

 

Seen above: English teacher TeriAnne Libby

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1-800-273-8255

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Editor-in-Chief

American rapper Logic released an album in May called Everybody, which has hit the top of the bill­board charts.

His music focuses on many of to­day’s problems, some from his own experience. This album features topics rang­ing from mental illness to mass shoot­ings, and has caught attention of many.

On his album, his songs focus on some­thing im­portant. He has songs about rac­ism, being broke, on welfare, being poor, and more. Logic is shedding light on who he is and the message he spreads as a whole.

The song “Anxiety,” addresses a panic attack he had in 2015 and a battle with crippling anxiety that led him to the hospital. Logic also grew up poor and had parents who struggled with addiction.

“I think Logic is very wise and has good ideas about how to better the world,” junior Cora Gladlow said.

A top hit on his album “1-800-273- 8255,Heart” was made to help those who are in a dark place and can’t seem to find the light. It is an anthem for suicide prevention, and makes a strong attempt to let the fan know some­one is there for them. It’s sup­posed to be an emotional plea for survival that encourag­es listeners to fight for their lives and over­come feelings of suicide.

“His new song 1-800 was very inspiring to young teens that are gay and/or suicidal. I believe it is re­ally deep, and it describes a lot of relatable experiences,” junior Kelli Bamford said.

Logic’s message is that no one is alone, and with all the problems in the world, we need to come togeth­er. With the spread of peace, love, and positivity, this world can be a better place.

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Fall is here

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Editor-in-Chief

Autumn is here, which means it’s time for the leaves to change colors and people throw on their sweaters. Apple picking, visiting pumpkin patches, and getting lost in corn maz­es are perfect things to do this time of year, and luckily there are some local establishments who specialize in these activities.

Mountain Valley Ranch, located in Ramona, is having its 20th anni­versary. It’s open seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and has free admission. They have many things to enjoy there, including: assortment of pumpkins and indian corn, a corn maze to get lost in, a corn cannon, a petting zoo, hayrides, and pony rides. All of these attractions are open 7 days a week, and the ranch is open through Oct. 31.

“What I love about fall is that I can wear colorful sweaters and go pump­kin picking with my friends and family,” senior Angela Weeks said.

There is a fall festival in Julian at Fort Cross Old Timey Adventures, and it opens every weekend through Oct. 29. Admission is free, which in­cludes entry to the pumpkin patch.

“I love going up to Julian during the fall, because the whole atmo­sphere is the essential part of fall,” sophomore Kaila Kiesel said.

There is a fall festival activity package, which is $20 per person or $5 for each activity. The activities in­clude hayrides, a hoedown, jug band participation, cider pressing, petting zoo, candle dipping, and pumpkin painting.

Additional activities like archery, tomahawk throw, and a paintball slingshot range are available. This is a great place to go to get that fall experience.

These are some fun and cool places to go to celebrate the new season. As the weather gets colder, these activities are a great way to spend an autumn day.

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Memory of Madi Taylor

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Editor-in-Chief

Madi Taylor, who would have been a freshman here, passed away on Oct. 15 after battling cancer since the sixth grade. Many Titans are af­fected by the loss, and some of her close friends remember her here.

“She was a true ray of sun­shine and didn’t let anyone get in the way of her happiness. Even though the time spent with her has become a memory, those moments are treasures. Everyone who got to know her, or even just met her knows that she gave so much to remember. Her happi­ness would always be a promise that you are loved. When we would go out and take pictures for class, she could turn the five minutes into an hour of fun and I will forever be grateful,” fresh­man Jenna Opel said.

“Madi is such a fighter and amazing girl that impacted my life and lives of others. I know she’s up there watching over us with all her puppies, and heaven got a beautiful angel and she will always hold a place in people’s hearts that no one else can fill. She left fingerprints of grace on our lives, and won’t be forgotten. Rest in peace, Madi Taylor,” fresh­man Samantha Seward said.

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Broadway Performances Coming to San Diego

ALEX STEARNS/ Staff Writer

Theatre Locations: The Civic Center & The Balboa Theatre, Downtown San Diego

KEY: * = The Civic Theatre

         3 = The Balboa Theatre

Matilda*

  • February: 1st (7:00 p.m.), 2nd (7:30 p.m.), 3rd (7:30 p.m.), 4th (2:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.), 5th (1:00 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.)

Russian National Ballet: Sleeping Beauty3

  • February: 5th (1:00 p.m.)

Branford Marsalis Quartet3

  • February: 10th (8:00 p.m.)

Leonidas Kavakos & Yunja Wang3

  • February: 11th (8:00 p.m.)

Cinema @ The Balboa Theatre – Disney’s Little Mermaid3

  • February: 12th (1:00 p.m.)

Cinema @ The Balboa Theatre – Breakfast At Tiffany’s3

  • February: 12th (5:00 p.m.)

Scott Bradlee Postmodern Jukebox3

  • February: 16th (7:30 p.m.)

Shaolin Warriors3

  • February: 17th (8:00 p.m.)

Falstaff by Giuseppe Verdi*

  • February: 18th (7:00 p.m.), 21st (7:00 p.m.), 24th (7:00 p.m.), 26th (2:00 p.m.)

#IMomSoHard

  • February: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

Under the Streetlamp3

  • March: 8th (4:00 p.m.)

The Legendary Farhad Darya3

  • February: 26th (7:00 p.m.)

Peter Pan*

  • March: 4th (2:30 p.m.) & (7:00 p.m.), 5th (1:00 p.m.)

The Tragedy of Carmen by Peter Brook3

  • March: 10th (7:00 p.m.), 11th (7:00 p.m.), 12th (2:00 p.m.)

Kinky Boots*

  • March: 10th (8:00 p.m.), 11th (2:00 p.m.) & (8:00 p.m.), 12th (1:00 p.m.) & (6:00 p.m.)

Zucchero Black Cat Tour3

  • March: 14th (7:30 p.m.)

Jay and the Silent Bob Get Old3

  • March: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

Malandain Ballet Biarritz: Beauty and the Beast*

  • March: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

An Evening with Neil Gaiman*

  • March: 29th (8:00 p.m.)

Max Raabe and Palast Orchestra3

  • March: 31st (8:00 p.m.)
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Celebrating the holiday season in Poway

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Pop-culture Editor–

Christmas is here, and what better way to spend the holidays than finding festive entertainment around the city. Whether you would like to gaze at bright lights, enjoy a play or two based on Christmas stories, or even go take a picture with the jolly man himself, now is the time to celebrate.

Here in Poway, many residents have dominated the Christmas decoration element. On Hickory Court/Hickory Street, Butterwood Court and Rockrose Court off of Twin Peaks road. and Silverset Street, locals cover their houses with stunning lights to create Candy Cane Courts. This year they are open from Dec. 10 to Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
If light sighting isn’t your favorite, then drive to the mountain town of Julian for a hot apple cider and a delicious piece of homemade apple pie. On Saturdays, you can stroll through the neighborhood streets and enjoy the sounds of wandering Christmas carolers and savor the sweater weather.
Down towards the coast, The Winter Wonderland at Del Mar Village celebrates the holidays with carolers strolling down the streets, a snow hill for children, meeting Santa Claus, a cake walk, seasonal treats to savor and holiday shopping at Del Mar Plaza.
If you take an interest in plays, then Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas is a great theatrical piece to see. It’s playing at The Old Globe from Nov. 5 to Dec. 26, and tickets start at $24.
There are many ways to spend the holidays, but the most important reason is that you spend it with the ones you love.

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Does football get more respect than other sports?

HANNAH WILLIAMS/Pop-Culture Editor–

Some athletes feel football players receive more opportunities than they do. Athletic director Damien Gonzalez says these perceptions are false.

“A lot of student athletes from other teams feel that because I’m the athletic director that our football program actually receives more benefits, which is not true. All athletes on campus are treated equally,” coach Gonzalez said.
Some point to how the football players receive extra benefits such as getting lunches every Friday or new uniforms. Everything that football has is because of fundraising. The money does not come from the athletic department, but from the football players spending time in the summer to fund-raise.
Furthermore,a chiropractor who volunteers on campus is not just for the football team. According to Gonzalez, he comes every Thursday to help out any student athlete for the entire year, not just during football season.
Another concern was during the lacrosse CIF finals last year. Some of the lights were dim, and lacrosse’s schedule was moved up because of opposing team complaints.
According to Gonzalez, the lights still aren’t fixed for football. They have to replace all of the bulbs in the summer when nobody’s around, because they have to shut down the cell towers, and were only able to replace some of the bulbs on the west side of the field.
The athletic department’s budget plan, is that football will bring in $50,000 during the year, basketball around $10,000, and wrestling around $2,000.
With the variety of different expenses, from athletic awards to CIF and State dues, the top expense is officials fees, which range anywhere from $30,000 to $40,000 a year.
So, looking at the income at about $78,000, where actual expenses last year were about $66,000, there is a projected budget.
If ASB/athletics gets extra money they use it for other things, such as purchasing hurdles for the track team, soccer goals for men’s and women’s soccer programs, wall pads for the gym, etc.
“So, I basically have the choice at the end of the year, where’s our needs and where are we going to put that money, and $0 has gone back to football” Gonzalez said.
“Last year with our extra money I decided to pay for boys and girls lacrosse and cheer’s transportation costs, since they’re not technically covered by the district, which was around $8,000 to $10,000,” coach Gonzalez added.
This year, the profits are slated to purchase gymnastic mats for Gymnastics.

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