Category Archives: Iliad

Broadway Performances Coming to San Diego

ALEX STEARNS/ Staff Writer

Theatre Locations: The Civic Center & The Balboa Theatre, Downtown San Diego

KEY: * = The Civic Theatre

         3 = The Balboa Theatre

Matilda*

  • February: 1st (7:00 p.m.), 2nd (7:30 p.m.), 3rd (7:30 p.m.), 4th (2:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.), 5th (1:00 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.)

Russian National Ballet: Sleeping Beauty3

  • February: 5th (1:00 p.m.)

Branford Marsalis Quartet3

  • February: 10th (8:00 p.m.)

Leonidas Kavakos & Yunja Wang3

  • February: 11th (8:00 p.m.)

Cinema @ The Balboa Theatre – Disney’s Little Mermaid3

  • February: 12th (1:00 p.m.)

Cinema @ The Balboa Theatre – Breakfast At Tiffany’s3

  • February: 12th (5:00 p.m.)

Scott Bradlee Postmodern Jukebox3

  • February: 16th (7:30 p.m.)

Shaolin Warriors3

  • February: 17th (8:00 p.m.)

Falstaff by Giuseppe Verdi*

  • February: 18th (7:00 p.m.), 21st (7:00 p.m.), 24th (7:00 p.m.), 26th (2:00 p.m.)

#IMomSoHard

  • February: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

Under the Streetlamp3

  • March: 8th (4:00 p.m.)

The Legendary Farhad Darya3

  • February: 26th (7:00 p.m.)

Peter Pan*

  • March: 4th (2:30 p.m.) & (7:00 p.m.), 5th (1:00 p.m.)

The Tragedy of Carmen by Peter Brook3

  • March: 10th (7:00 p.m.), 11th (7:00 p.m.), 12th (2:00 p.m.)

Kinky Boots*

  • March: 10th (8:00 p.m.), 11th (2:00 p.m.) & (8:00 p.m.), 12th (1:00 p.m.) & (6:00 p.m.)

Zucchero Black Cat Tour3

  • March: 14th (7:30 p.m.)

Jay and the Silent Bob Get Old3

  • March: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

Malandain Ballet Biarritz: Beauty and the Beast*

  • March: 18th (8:00 p.m.)

An Evening with Neil Gaiman*

  • March: 29th (8:00 p.m.)

Max Raabe and Palast Orchestra3

  • March: 31st (8:00 p.m.)
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Celebrating the holiday season in Poway

HANNAH WILLIAMS/ Pop-culture Editor–

Christmas is here, and what better way to spend the holidays than finding festive entertainment around the city. Whether you would like to gaze at bright lights, enjoy a play or two based on Christmas stories, or even go take a picture with the jolly man himself, now is the time to celebrate.

Here in Poway, many residents have dominated the Christmas decoration element. On Hickory Court/Hickory Street, Butterwood Court and Rockrose Court off of Twin Peaks road. and Silverset Street, locals cover their houses with stunning lights to create Candy Cane Courts. This year they are open from Dec. 10 to Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
If light sighting isn’t your favorite, then drive to the mountain town of Julian for a hot apple cider and a delicious piece of homemade apple pie. On Saturdays, you can stroll through the neighborhood streets and enjoy the sounds of wandering Christmas carolers and savor the sweater weather.
Down towards the coast, The Winter Wonderland at Del Mar Village celebrates the holidays with carolers strolling down the streets, a snow hill for children, meeting Santa Claus, a cake walk, seasonal treats to savor and holiday shopping at Del Mar Plaza.
If you take an interest in plays, then Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas is a great theatrical piece to see. It’s playing at The Old Globe from Nov. 5 to Dec. 26, and tickets start at $24.
There are many ways to spend the holidays, but the most important reason is that you spend it with the ones you love.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Does football get more respect than other sports?

HANNAH WILLIAMS/Pop-Culture Editor–

Some athletes feel football players receive more opportunities than they do. Athletic director Damien Gonzalez says these perceptions are false.

“A lot of student athletes from other teams feel that because I’m the athletic director that our football program actually receives more benefits, which is not true. All athletes on campus are treated equally,” coach Gonzalez said.
Some point to how the football players receive extra benefits such as getting lunches every Friday or new uniforms. Everything that football has is because of fundraising. The money does not come from the athletic department, but from the football players spending time in the summer to fund-raise.
Furthermore,a chiropractor who volunteers on campus is not just for the football team. According to Gonzalez, he comes every Thursday to help out any student athlete for the entire year, not just during football season.
Another concern was during the lacrosse CIF finals last year. Some of the lights were dim, and lacrosse’s schedule was moved up because of opposing team complaints.
According to Gonzalez, the lights still aren’t fixed for football. They have to replace all of the bulbs in the summer when nobody’s around, because they have to shut down the cell towers, and were only able to replace some of the bulbs on the west side of the field.
The athletic department’s budget plan, is that football will bring in $50,000 during the year, basketball around $10,000, and wrestling around $2,000.
With the variety of different expenses, from athletic awards to CIF and State dues, the top expense is officials fees, which range anywhere from $30,000 to $40,000 a year.
So, looking at the income at about $78,000, where actual expenses last year were about $66,000, there is a projected budget.
If ASB/athletics gets extra money they use it for other things, such as purchasing hurdles for the track team, soccer goals for men’s and women’s soccer programs, wall pads for the gym, etc.
“So, I basically have the choice at the end of the year, where’s our needs and where are we going to put that money, and $0 has gone back to football” Gonzalez said.
“Last year with our extra money I decided to pay for boys and girls lacrosse and cheer’s transportation costs, since they’re not technically covered by the district, which was around $8,000 to $10,000,” coach Gonzalez added.
This year, the profits are slated to purchase gymnastic mats for Gymnastics.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Misconceptions about mental illness

AMINA IDOUI/ Staff Writer

When the times get tough, it can be tempting to shut yourself off from others and try to handle problems on your own. Your friends are here for you, though, and likewise, we should be here to support our friends through their struggles. But when your friend is dealing with a mental illness, how do you help? What can you do?
It all depends on being open-minded and accepting. Most importantly, it is to be an ally for them.
Stand up for your friend, and understand that depending on which condition they have, their condition may speak for them, causing them to say things and do things they may not really mean.
Communication is just as important. Ask your friend how they really want to be treated. Be willing to listen to them, and educate yourself about their mental illness. Each one affects people in different ways, so using the internet or just asking your friend about it will help you be a better ally to them.
“If you have someone who is bipolar, I’d want you to treat them differently than someone who has anxiety,” Traci Barker-Ball says.
One of the worst things you can do for your friend is to not validate them, or to disregard them.
“It’s not just for seeking attention, it’s for seeking help,” school psychologist Joan Shin says.
“[Their support] is a nice balance between knowing they’re there and I can go to them if they aren’t,” a Poway High School student with anxiety said.
Ultimately, the best strategy for supporting your peers is to be very empathetic. You may not understand exactly what they are dealing with, but you can be supportive by being willing to listen and by standing up for those who need to.

Art by: Jonathan Ballestero

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The do’s and dont’s of the student section

school-spirit-2

By: Brett Masaki

Most Poway High students look forward to Friday football games, but along with the fun there have been some new rules set by students and administration.
“One may not enter unless decked out in Poway attire, ready to get hyped out of their minds, and ready to go undefeated,” senior Ben Decker said.
Along with these rules set by Ben Decker, new rules were set last week by administrators, such as students not being allowed to enter the student section with outside food or drinks and students not being allowed to leave the game and reenter.
These new rules were set, “to clean up the area and make it safer,” Assistant Principle Aaron Little said. The rules were also put in place because of past events where students brought alcohol into the games.
Changes were made by ASB Advisor Emily Pratt, Damien Gonzales, four admin members and one of the counselors, Blanca Arreguin.
Many students do not like this rule.
“I have a weekly Friday tradition for football games where I like to bring a burrito to eat because I have to get there so early to get a good spot,” senior Ryan Carlson said.
Along with these new rules, many people want to see a little more etiquette out of the student section.
“I have heard so much bad language in the student section, and I think it should stop,”senior Nick Beeson said.
The student section etiquette is important to keep in mind through game season.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Durbin drives through the dirt

adam-durbin

By: Hannah Williams

Ever since he was five years old, junior Adam Durbin knew he had a passion for BMX biking.
“I love racing BMX and mountain bikes because it’s an adrenaline rush that you can’t really get in any high school sports,” junior Adam Durbin said, “I love how it has taken me around the country and the world to race my bike. What’s not to love about that? Being able to travel the world and do what you love.”
BMX, where competitors race at a speed of about 25-30 mph, includes eight riders racing on dirt and asphalt tracks going over jumps, turns, and other obstacles. Durbin has won multiple local races in BMX, two state championships in 2013 and 2015, a national championship in 2016, and has been selected to represent the United States of America at the world championships in England in 2012 and Belgium in 2015.
“BMX is a time where I only have one goal: to win. And if I don’t win, it’s time to learn from my mistakes and fix them so I win the next one,” Durbin said.
He has quite a few sponsors, such as Fly Racing and Ellsworth Bikes, which help him get where he wants to be.
“The best experience I’ve had in all my years of racing would have to be my 2013 state championship, because not only was it a long shot to win, but there was a lot of drama between me and another competitor,” Durbin said.
In BMX, athletes can cross over the line after they are 30 feet out of the gate and cut other competitors off to an extent. Since the other athlete had a fairly decent head start, he crossed over Durbin, and buzzed his back tire and crashed. Durbin’s opponent was not harmed, so he got up and finished the race.
“After the race, I went to go shake his hand, but he punched me in the helmet. The kids’ dad ran over and yelled at me, before pushing me to the ground. After all that, I thought I wouldn’t be able to race because there is a no tolerance rule about fighting. However, the owner saw what happened and he said ‘You’re all good. No grown man has the right to put his hands on someone else’s kid.’” Adam got to race in the final, and ended up winning the state championship.
After high school, Durbin hopes to achieve his ultimate goal: to make a career as a professional racer.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Memory Project creates portraits for orphans

hensey-2By: Mia Cervantes

A handful of students in Heidi Hensey’s art class are currently working on the Memory Project for Orphans in Columbia. The Memory Project is a charity organization that invites students to provide a handmade portrait for less fortunate kids around the world. This is not an assigned project that students earn a grade for, but instead a voluntary project that they choose. Students receive a picture of their kid and work on a portrait for several weeks. People choose to work on this project to feel good and along with the portrait, they donate $15 towards the cause.
Hensey found the Memory Project website in 2011 while Google searching for portraits and has given her students the option to participate in this cause ever since.
“These kids have nothing, no memento of childhood, so these portraits are so meaningful to them,” Hensey said.
When the orphans receive their artwork, their reactions are recorded on video and are sent back to the students who created their portraits. Students are able to see these kids light up when they receive these special portraits delivered from across the world.
“We want the portraits to help the children feel valued and important, to know that many people care about their well being, and to act as meaningful pieces of personal history in the future,” according to the Memory Project Website.
This year, students from Level 2 and up, work on these projects for less fortunate kids in Columbia. In earlier years, Hensey’s students have worked on portraits for kids in Ghana, Haiti, Vietnam, and Cambodia. Over the years, portraits have been for all ages, toddlers to teenagers.
“I’ve been working really hard on this portrait, and I’m really excited to see my kid’s reaction. That will make all this time and hard work totally worth it,” Emily Plummer, a junior in Level 3 said.
Hensey is excited and glad that she was able to find this organization. Ever since she became involved in this cause, she has been working closely with the founder Ben Shumaker. Hensey says that it has been amazing working with him along with the whole organization. She looks forward to giving many more students the opportunity to make kids’ days by using their artistic talents.
For these Titans their projects are something special that they will remember forever.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Lacrosse takes CIF

On May 27, the guys took on Coronado, who they had lost to by a score of 9-8 earlier in the season. Thanks to a game winning shot by Cole Landolt with 5 seconds remaining in the game, they moved on to the CIF championship, this time on the winning side of a 9-8 score.

The CIF championship was on May 30, between Poway and Torrey Pines. Zach Hodge had three out of the Titans’ eight goals and a solid Titan defense thwarted Torrey Pines’ comeback attempt in the final minutes, leading to a 9-8 win. This was the Titans first CIF championship since 2002.

Boys’ lacrosse has had a successful season to this point, as they did well enough in the regular season to make it to the CIF semifinals against Coronado High School on May 25.

They finished the regular season with a record of 15-6, which was good enough take league.

Some standout players included the four captains: Cole Landolt, Jake Fiske, Zach Hodge, and Nick Beeson. As three juniors and one sophomore respectively, the four will be returning next year, which is good news for the Titans.

“I am very impressed with the way the season has gone so far and have high hopes for the playoffs,” Fiske said.

One highlight of this season was when the Titans played La Costa Canyon High School. The Mavericks were CIF champions last season but the Titans were able to edge out a win by a score of 8-7.

Cole Landolt shot the winning goal with 56 seconds left in the game to take the win from last year’s champs.

The Titans ended the regular season as league champions and went undefeated in league. This is even more impressive if you consider the fact that the team has only one senior, and will be returning, basically intact, next season.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

PLUS

PATRICK CUNNINGHAM/Associate Editor

Love interacting and learning about other students? “PLUS stands for Pure Leaders Uniting Students the point of PLUS is to get kids together that don’t normally interact  with each other, and then we put them into small groups and they talk about issues that are important to them, and problems they see in our campus,” Student Service Supervisor Tracy Barker ball said.  The deadlines for the permission slips for the March 16th all-day on campus field trip are Mar.6th and April 15th. The dates of the event are March 16th April 27th it is encouraged that everyone tries to participate for this great opportunity to unite as one big Poway High School family.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
« Older Entries