Author Archives: Powayiliad

Lerner Leads Event Horse to Glory

MASON KERN/Sports Editor

Horseback riding is hard enough for most to do in and of itself. Beyond the basics of just riding this gracious animal, training it to compete in the harshest of conditions is a challenge that takes equal parts skill, patience and tenacity. This is what senior Madi Lerner has done since she was just a little girl.

“Eventing,” basically the equivalent of an equestrian triathlon, encompasses both physical and mental components that must be undertaken by both horse and rider. There are three phases associated with eventing: dressage, endurance and show jumping. Lerner has trained her horse, Jasper, since 2008 and has loved every moment of her time as an equestrian trainer and rider.

“I started riding because my mom wouldn’t get me a puppy or kitten for my seventh birthday, and instead got me riding lessons,” Lerner said. “From the first lesson, I was so glad that she didn’t get me the puppy or kitten because I immediately fell in love with riding.”

“Horseback riding makes me feel fulfilled. I feel like I can accomplish anything because it’s the part of my life that makes me feel whole, like I have a purpose,” Lerner continued.

Competitions last three days, with the first being dressage. This is followed by endurance and, lastly, show jumping. Dressage is scored based on the intricate movements that the animal makes in harmony with its trainer. Optimally the animal performs required tasks of its own accord, so as to not disobey the trainer.

Lerner competed in the national championships held at Woodside Horse Park in Redwood City, California. There she, along with her companion athlete Jasper, secured the win. However, after this event, she sustained a concussion and nerve damage when she was bucked off her horse during a training session. While she qualified for the championships again this year and the following, she is unable to attend this year’s event because protocol mandates that injuries of her kind must keep riders out of competition for a whole year.

“I knew that my injury was just a small part of my life, and that I could grow and move on from it. Also, I knew that Jasper counted on me to come back and to prove that we can compete against that we will stay a strong team and come back better than ever,” Lerner noted.

She hopes to continue to compete in equestrian events in the future, and hopes to continue fostering the best relationship possible with Jasper, as well as all other horses Lerner competes with.

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Explaining the PE Waiver System

MASON KERN/Sports Editor

There are a plethora of young athletes stuck in the physical education system who crave to escape. Because of this, Poway High School has implemented the PE waiver system to help those people who are already in a junior varsity level sport complete other electives of their choice other than PE. But not all of these athletes understand the process of how to acquire one of these waivers; the answer is located in our Registrar’s office

The PE waiver system aims to help students who are enrolled in physical education to receive their credits by playing the sports in which they are already a part of. As the sports seasons heat up, it is important that young athletes meet the deadline of the PE waiver to escape the horror of the daily activities associated with physical education. Registrar Tania Rowe explains how it works:

“The PE waiver is used for students who are participating in CIF sports. What it does is when you complete a season of CIF sports you can waive five credits of PE. Now that doesn’t make those credits go away, you still need 230 credits to graduate, but instead of  taking PE, which is a state requirement, because you’ve done a CIF sport we allow you to take something in place of that. Because the graduation requirement is two completed years of physical education, the PE waiver comes in handy for young athletes.

However, some students within the school have voiced confusion over how the system works. The rules and regulations associated with the PE waiver are vast because students are required to be at least a sophomore in high school, and be on a junior varsity level sports team, along with other prerequisites.

Because of this,  many students do not bother obtaining one which they deserve because they do not want to deal with the process, “I think a lot of people get confused and eventually disregard this great resource, it really is a shame,” senior Connor Lynch said.

In response to the concern, the school board was clear and concise, and hopefully their answer will clear the air for those who are considering achieving the waiver.

“You can’t have PE on your schedule and waive it at the same time, so freshmen are not eligible. And seniors, we don’t allow to do it in their second semester because if they get injured they can’t complete their sport and then they just wouldn’t graduate because they got injured whereas if you’re in PE and you get injured you can provide a doctor’s note and still pass the class,” Rowe said.

Overall the system seeks to improve the lives of the student body and make it easier for athletes to graduate without having to deal with the struggle that is the public physical education system.

 

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Energy Drink: Red Bull Vs. Monster

ADAM VOGGENTHALER/Staff Writer

Monster and Red Bull are two of the most popular drinks out there.

There are many minor differences between the two that make people prefer one over the other.  For one Monster’s can size is sixteen ounces and Red Bull is served in a twelve ounce can.  Monster energy has a whopping  54 grams of sugar compared to Red Bull only has 37 grams. thus giving Monster a sweeter taste.  The caffeine level in both drinks is extremely high.

Monster tops it off with a massive 89 milligrams of caffeine and Red Bull has 111miligrams. In comparison, an average cup of coffee has 95 milligrams.

There is also a minor price difference that sets apart the two products.  Monster energy drink sells for around three dollars while Red Bull can sell for almost five dollars per can.

Many Titans prefer Red Bull over Monster because Red Bull is faster to drink.  “In my opinion I like Red Bull better because its faster to drink due to the size of the bottle and it makes me feel alive” senior Ryan Carlson Said.  Carlson is not the only titan that prefers red bull.  Many Titans also think Red Bull tastes better “Red Bull simply tastes better than monster” Junior Teryn Correa states .

Many Titans have conflicting views on these two drinks but they both give the person drinking it tons of energy.

Freshmen Tyler Book likes Monster better because “ better” than Red Bull.  Personally, I do not really prefer one over the other.  If I had to choose one drink over the other I would have to go with Monster because I like the taste better.  Topic will always be a hot one.

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42nd Season of SNL

KATELYN DALI/Editor-in-Chief

The time has come for new seasons, the leaves are falling and the weather is cooling down slightly for San Diego, and now the new season of Saturday Night Live is released.

Lorne Michaels and Dick Ebersol created the series in 1975. Over the past 50 years the show has aired with a total of 796 episodes. It has won the most Emmys out of all series with 45 in total and 202 nominations. It has also ranked 7th of top 100 entertainers.

It has launched multiple famous actors towards their career including Chris Rock, Will Forte, Tracy Morgan, and most importantly, Eddy Murphy.

The 42nd season premiered on October 1st on NBC. Starting the episode, the host Margot Robbie introduced hit artist the Weeknd, as they played their new ranking songs Starboy and False Alarm. Alec Baldwin took over by impersonating Donald Trump in a parody of the presidential debate. While Alec Baldwins acting career seems to be nonexistent, his portrayel of Trump is pretty much spot on

Although not much is known about what new skits the show will be performing in the future, new actors plan to hit the stage for the remainder of the series, including a new trio of Mikey Day, Alex Moffat, and Melissa Villasenor. The talented cast s season well, and the comedy is better than ever. However, famous stars Taran Killam, Jay Pharoah, and John Rudnitsky will not return and are taking their talent elsewhere.

Grab your coffee and get ready to stay up late, for the next episodes airing at midnight every Saturday.

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Field Hockey Steps Up

The Iliad/ Beaty Pitts

Senior Isabelle Flud attacks the opposing goal with ferocity. The Titans beat Westview 4-3 on Oct. 4.

MASON KERN/Sports Editor

The girls’ field hockey team started their season strong, and they look to continue their success as the season moves forward. Having already played a total ten games, the team has jumped out to an early 7-3 season (at the time of publication), and a win percentage of 70 percent. The team hopes to continue their large strides, and build on their Sept. 29 win against Fallbrook High School.

“Our team this year has really good chemistry. We know what each other are going to do and we will always be there for each other,” team captain and San Diego State University commit Isabelle Flud said.

With seven goals to her name already early on in the season, Flud looks to continue to lead her team towards greatness. The team chemistry is evident as the girls are undefeated at home. The team’s plays show that they are very comfortable with one another; and they understand each other’s playing style very well.

The team hopes to get a positive result in their upcoming games on Oct. 18 at Poway versus San Pasqual High School, and Nov. 2 against arch-rival Rancho Bernardo High School.

“We lost a lot of seniors and core players last year, but we still have very capable players this year and I’m sure we’ll perform well in the remainder of our season,” field hockey athlete Lauren Whitney said.

As for the coaching, the staff seems to be leading the program in the right direction, and it is evident that their tactics are having an impact on the players.

“Our coaches press us really hard in practices and in games so we can succeed both on and off the field,” Isabelle Flud said.

The Titans’ will surely be a force to be reckoned with as the season continues, and will command a high seed going into the playoffs if their recent play continues. Led by both Isabelle Flud, and junior Lauren Leland, the girls’ field hockey team will look to get a result in their upcoming game against Del Norte on Oct. 12.

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Cross Country Titans Take on Seattle

Iliad/ Luke Beckwith

The Iliad/ Luke Beckwith

Left: Seniors Jarett Chinn, Tyler Neal, Kyle Kesler, Michael Downs, Zach Kraft, and Cameron Hirsh

MASON KERN/Sports Editor

Poway High has a history of competing in big cross country events, including the Stanford Invitational in Palo Alto, California last year. This year the team was looking for a bigger challenge, even outside of California, which led them to take their talents to Seattle, Washington.

Lakewood High School hosted the 33rd annual Nike Hole in the Wall Cross Country Invitational on Oct. 8, which saw teams spanning from Hawaii to British Columbia and even up into Canada— including our own Titans.

At this largest cross country race in Washington State, including college and professional races, the Titans placed extremely well, securing first place for varsity boys, and a respectable 12th place for varsity girls.

“For me, it was one of my better races, but it was our teams’ depth that really helped us prevail and show the state of Washington what Poway Cross Country was really about,” senior Jarett Chinn said.

The boys’ team took first place overall in the 5,000 meter run with a total of 169 points, lower than any other team. The second place team was Glacier Peak with 192 points followed by Camas with 197 points.

Chinn was Poway’s top finisher, placing ninth in a time of 16-minutes, 1.6-seconds. Senior Michael Downs was next at 27th in 16:23.4 and senior Tyler Neal landed 33rd with a personal best of 16:31.3. Senior Gavin Blaine was the biggest surprise coming in at 48th in 16:40.4, which was also a personal best. The same for senior Cameron Hirsch at 67th in 16:57, senior Zach Kraft at 83rd in 17:07.8, and senior Kyle Kesler at 93rd in 17:14.5.

“I was the last choice to go on the trip, and I was expected to finish last on the Poway team for our heat,” Blaine said. “I told myself this was the last time I could run this race, and I ran really well. Nobody there knew of Poway, so I knew we needed to make sure they all remembered our name.”

The girls’ varsity team scored 362 points for their 12th place win. The top three teams included Jesuit with 52 points, Camas with 99 points and Edmonds-Woodway with 110 points.

Katie Downs secured the best time for Poway coming in 48th place with a time of 19-minutes, 30.6-seconds. She was followed by Alex Calegari at 50th in 19:32.4 and then Kinley Williams at 77th in 20:07.6. Sarah Chittle followed immediately after at 78th place in 20:10.7, and freshman Eva Rethmeier at 140th in 21:08.0

“I expected it to be a tough race because many of the top teams from Oregon and Washington were there, and they knew how to run in those conditions,” Kraft said.

The Titans likewise found success at the 69th Mt. Sac Cross Country Invitational on Oct. 22, finishing in 13th place. The top runner was again Chinn placing 23rd for the Titans, followed by Downs at 30th and senior Kit Carter at 51st.

They hope to run into CIF with a high seed, and to compete well at the North County Conference Finals on Nov. 12.

 

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Misconceptions about mental illness

AMINA IDOUI/ Staff Writer

When the times get tough, it can be tempting to shut yourself off from others and try to handle problems on your own. Your friends are here for you, though, and likewise, we should be here to support our friends through their struggles. But when your friend is dealing with a mental illness, how do you help? What can you do?
It all depends on being open-minded and accepting. Most importantly, it is to be an ally for them.
Stand up for your friend, and understand that depending on which condition they have, their condition may speak for them, causing them to say things and do things they may not really mean.
Communication is just as important. Ask your friend how they really want to be treated. Be willing to listen to them, and educate yourself about their mental illness. Each one affects people in different ways, so using the internet or just asking your friend about it will help you be a better ally to them.
“If you have someone who is bipolar, I’d want you to treat them differently than someone who has anxiety,” Traci Barker-Ball says.
One of the worst things you can do for your friend is to not validate them, or to disregard them.
“It’s not just for seeking attention, it’s for seeking help,” school psychologist Joan Shin says.
“[Their support] is a nice balance between knowing they’re there and I can go to them if they aren’t,” a Poway High School student with anxiety said.
Ultimately, the best strategy for supporting your peers is to be very empathetic. You may not understand exactly what they are dealing with, but you can be supportive by being willing to listen and by standing up for those who need to.

Art by: Jonathan Ballestero

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The do’s and dont’s of the student section

school-spirit-2

By: Brett Masaki

Most Poway High students look forward to Friday football games, but along with the fun there have been some new rules set by students and administration.
“One may not enter unless decked out in Poway attire, ready to get hyped out of their minds, and ready to go undefeated,” senior Ben Decker said.
Along with these rules set by Ben Decker, new rules were set last week by administrators, such as students not being allowed to enter the student section with outside food or drinks and students not being allowed to leave the game and reenter.
These new rules were set, “to clean up the area and make it safer,” Assistant Principle Aaron Little said. The rules were also put in place because of past events where students brought alcohol into the games.
Changes were made by ASB Advisor Emily Pratt, Damien Gonzales, four admin members and one of the counselors, Blanca Arreguin.
Many students do not like this rule.
“I have a weekly Friday tradition for football games where I like to bring a burrito to eat because I have to get there so early to get a good spot,” senior Ryan Carlson said.
Along with these new rules, many people want to see a little more etiquette out of the student section.
“I have heard so much bad language in the student section, and I think it should stop,”senior Nick Beeson said.
The student section etiquette is important to keep in mind through game season.

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Durbin drives through the dirt

adam-durbin

By: Hannah Williams

Ever since he was five years old, junior Adam Durbin knew he had a passion for BMX biking.
“I love racing BMX and mountain bikes because it’s an adrenaline rush that you can’t really get in any high school sports,” junior Adam Durbin said, “I love how it has taken me around the country and the world to race my bike. What’s not to love about that? Being able to travel the world and do what you love.”
BMX, where competitors race at a speed of about 25-30 mph, includes eight riders racing on dirt and asphalt tracks going over jumps, turns, and other obstacles. Durbin has won multiple local races in BMX, two state championships in 2013 and 2015, a national championship in 2016, and has been selected to represent the United States of America at the world championships in England in 2012 and Belgium in 2015.
“BMX is a time where I only have one goal: to win. And if I don’t win, it’s time to learn from my mistakes and fix them so I win the next one,” Durbin said.
He has quite a few sponsors, such as Fly Racing and Ellsworth Bikes, which help him get where he wants to be.
“The best experience I’ve had in all my years of racing would have to be my 2013 state championship, because not only was it a long shot to win, but there was a lot of drama between me and another competitor,” Durbin said.
In BMX, athletes can cross over the line after they are 30 feet out of the gate and cut other competitors off to an extent. Since the other athlete had a fairly decent head start, he crossed over Durbin, and buzzed his back tire and crashed. Durbin’s opponent was not harmed, so he got up and finished the race.
“After the race, I went to go shake his hand, but he punched me in the helmet. The kids’ dad ran over and yelled at me, before pushing me to the ground. After all that, I thought I wouldn’t be able to race because there is a no tolerance rule about fighting. However, the owner saw what happened and he said ‘You’re all good. No grown man has the right to put his hands on someone else’s kid.’” Adam got to race in the final, and ended up winning the state championship.
After high school, Durbin hopes to achieve his ultimate goal: to make a career as a professional racer.

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Memory Project creates portraits for orphans

hensey-2By: Mia Cervantes

A handful of students in Heidi Hensey’s art class are currently working on the Memory Project for Orphans in Columbia. The Memory Project is a charity organization that invites students to provide a handmade portrait for less fortunate kids around the world. This is not an assigned project that students earn a grade for, but instead a voluntary project that they choose. Students receive a picture of their kid and work on a portrait for several weeks. People choose to work on this project to feel good and along with the portrait, they donate $15 towards the cause.
Hensey found the Memory Project website in 2011 while Google searching for portraits and has given her students the option to participate in this cause ever since.
“These kids have nothing, no memento of childhood, so these portraits are so meaningful to them,” Hensey said.
When the orphans receive their artwork, their reactions are recorded on video and are sent back to the students who created their portraits. Students are able to see these kids light up when they receive these special portraits delivered from across the world.
“We want the portraits to help the children feel valued and important, to know that many people care about their well being, and to act as meaningful pieces of personal history in the future,” according to the Memory Project Website.
This year, students from Level 2 and up, work on these projects for less fortunate kids in Columbia. In earlier years, Hensey’s students have worked on portraits for kids in Ghana, Haiti, Vietnam, and Cambodia. Over the years, portraits have been for all ages, toddlers to teenagers.
“I’ve been working really hard on this portrait, and I’m really excited to see my kid’s reaction. That will make all this time and hard work totally worth it,” Emily Plummer, a junior in Level 3 said.
Hensey is excited and glad that she was able to find this organization. Ever since she became involved in this cause, she has been working closely with the founder Ben Shumaker. Hensey says that it has been amazing working with him along with the whole organization. She looks forward to giving many more students the opportunity to make kids’ days by using their artistic talents.
For these Titans their projects are something special that they will remember forever.

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